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McClean slams FA for investigation into social media post slating Stoke fans for poppy criticism


James McClean has slammed an FA investigation into his Instagram post where he labelled Stoke fans who booed him for not wearing a poppy ‘uneducated cavemen’.

McClean was abused by a section of his team’s own supporters during their 0-0 draw with Middlesbrough on Saturday before an angry confrontation with a section of the away support after the final whistle.

Upon learning of the FA’s investigation, McClean vented his dismay once again over social media.

James McClean once again opted not to wear a poppy on his Stoke shirt for Remembrance Day

James McClean once again opted not to wear a poppy on his Stoke shirt for Remembrance Day

McClean received absue from Middlesbrough fans and his own Stoke supporters on Saturday

McClean received absue from Middlesbrough fans and his own Stoke supporters on Saturday

McClean received absue from Middlesbrough fans and his own Stoke supporters on Saturday

McClean hit out at Stoke fans on social media and is now under an FA investigation  

McClean hit out at Stoke fans on social media and is now under an FA investigation  

McClean hit out at Stoke fans on social media and is now under an FA investigation  

‘The FA are investigating me after Saturday’s event, for what exactly?’ he said in an Instagram post on Monday.

‘Yet week in week out for the past 7 years I get constant sectarian abuse, death threats, objects being thrown, chanting which is heard loud and clear every week which my family, wife and kids have to listen too (sic), they turn a blind eye and not a single word of condemnation of any sort.

‘Huddersfield away last year while playing West Brom where there was an incident which [sic] their fans which was on the game highlights, where the cameras clearly caught it yet the FA when complaint was made to them said there ‘was not enough evidence. 

‘If it was a persons skin colour, of it was anti muslim, someones (sic) gender they would be an (sic) complete uproar and it would taking in a complete different way and dealt with in a different manner. 

‘But like in Neil Lennon case in Scotland because we are Irish Catholics they turn a blind eye and nothing is ever said and done.’

On Sunday, McClean said about Stoke supporters: ‘Your abuse, your throwing things, your booing, do your worst.. to the home fans that are actually educated and support me, thank yous [sic].

‘To the section of uneducated cavemen in left hand corner of the boothen end stand that want to song their anti irish song each game and call me a fenian this and that.. i am a PROUD FENIAN no c*** will ever change that, so sing away.’ 

McClean explained his decision not to wear a poppy last week, saying: ‘I know many people won’t agree with my decision or even attempt to gain an understanding of why I don’t wear a poppy.

‘I accept that but I would ask people to be respectful of the choice I have made, just as I’m respectful of people who do choose to wear a poppy.’

McClean is from Derry in Northern Ireland and grew up on the Creggan estate were six of the people who were killed on Bloody Sunday came from. 

Bloody Sunday saw 28 unarmed civilians shot by British soldiers in a peaceful protest march.

McClean issued an impassioned statement on his Instagram on Sunday 

McClean issued an impassioned statement on his Instagram on Sunday 

McClean issued an impassioned statement on his Instagram on Sunday 

McClean will not be wearing a poppy in Stoke's next game, away at Nottingham Forest

McClean will not be wearing a poppy in Stoke's next game, away at Nottingham Forest

McClean will not be wearing a poppy in Stoke’s next game, away at Nottingham Forest

‘If the poppy was simply about World War One and Two victims alone, I’d wear it without a problem,’ McClean said in 2014.

‘I would wear it every day of the year if that was the thing but it doesn’t, it stands for all conflicts that Britain has been involved in. Because of the history of where I come from in Derry, I cannot wear something that represents that.

‘For people from the North of Ireland such as myself, and specifically those in Derry, scene of the 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre, the poppy has come to mean something very different.’ 



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