HEALTH

Super Bowl LIII diets, splurges and fan snacks, revealed


The Super Bowl is about so much more than the game to players and fans alike: it’s also about the food. 

Many NFL teams now keep nutritionists or dietitians on staff to ensure that the players are fed and fueled for peak performance. 

But for the occasion of the Super Bowl, even the best athletes have their pet splurges – and so do fans. 

We reveal who’s eating what – and where – on game day. 

New England Patriots players indulged in turkey on the field on Thanksgiving, but for most of the year they keep to regimented diets 

New England Patriots players indulged in turkey on the field on Thanksgiving, but for most of the year they keep to regimented diets 

HOW TO EAT LIKE A PRO: NFL PLAYER’S DAILY DIETS WHEN IT’S NOT THE SUPER BOWL

An NFL player’s diet varies depending on the period of the season, the position he plays, the time he spends on the field and his own personal metabolism, former Seattle Seahawks diet consultant Dr Susan Kleiner told Daily Mail Online. 

‘In general, there’s the lineman people who block and the people who run,’ she said. 

‘They all need agility, but it’s a question of do you run into a wall or are do you need to be able to run as fast as you can.’  

And the times have changed, so while football players still need to consume a lot of calories it’s now just as much about quality as quantity, and the focus is on whole foods. 

But time is also of the essence. At the height of training, many players just don’t have the time to sit down and eat as many calories as they need to fuel them, so their diets are often part smoothies, shakes and supplements. 

SUPER BOWL STARS’ FAST FOOD FAVORITES 

Both the Rams and the Patriots love indulging in fast food. 

They have favorite spots in every state, including The Varsity in Atlanta, where the game will be held. 

So NJ.com decided to ask some of the top players what their orders were to get an insight into how they eat. 

Here is what they ordered in one sitting:

PATRIOTS

Adam Butler, defensive tackle 

  • Chili cheese dog
  • bacon cheeseburger
  • grilled cheese
  • french fries
  • bottled water & shake 
  • fried apple pie a la mode

Ted Karras, offensive lineman 

  • Two chili cheese dogs
  • cheese fries
  • large chocolate shake 
  • fried apple pie

Danny Shelton, defensive tackle

  • Medium frosted orange shake
  • large vanilla shake
  • BLT
  • two triple bacon cheeseburgers
  • cheeseburger
  • two large fries
  • onion rings
  • two 5-piece nuggets 
  • a Sprite

RAMS  

Rodger Saffold, guard 

  • Two double bacon cheeseburgers
  • three chili cheese dogs
  • french fries
  • onion rings
  • large chocolate shake 
  • fried apple pie a la mode

Jamil Demby, offensive guard  

  • Two fried apples
  • triple bacon cheeseburger
  • chili cheese dog
  • chili cheese fries
  • large chocolate shake 
  • 5-piece nuggets 

Rob Havenstein, offensive tackle 

  • Chili dog (no mustard)
  • cheese dog with all fixins and onions on top
  • double bacon cheeseburger
  • onion rings
  • small frosted orange shake 
  • a large sweet tea

Depending on weight, a player may need to consume between 3,500 to 6,000 calories a day, drink the equivalent of two or three cups of milk, and half as many ounces of water as he ways in pounds. 

According to Dr Kleiner, a typical day’s meals might go like this:  

MORNING 

  • Several starches, like whole grain bread, oatmeal, potatoes or cream of wheat 
  • Several servings of fruit, to bolster antioxidants for better recovery  
  • One whole egg, plus two or more egg whites – preferably with some vegetables or avocado mixed in 

After lighter morning activities or reviewing recordings of games, players might grab a smoothie that ‘hides vegetables and fruit,’ before hitting the field for practice. 

MID-DAY   

Depending on time and position, mid-day meals vary.

Quarterbacks may have more practices and need to stay light, so they might have a light turkey sandwich or another smoothie or protein shake. 

Blockers and other players have more time to bulk up at lunch and are more likely to have:

  • Chicken breast or sliced turkey 
  • Potatoes or another starch 
  • Several servings of vegetables – the more diverse the better – steamed or sauted 
  • Salad of dark leafy greens 
  • Quinoa bowl 
  • Another couple servings of fruit 

Then it’s time to ‘sit again, digest and train again,’ Dr Kleiner says, and perhaps grab another smoothie on the way to the field. 

EVENING

‘Dinner should be robust,’ Dr Kleiner says. 

It might include a large spread of: 

  • Six ounces or more of a lean protein – particularly fatty acid-rich salmon 
  • A cup of potatoes, quinoa or both 
  • Another two or more servings of vegetables and fruit 

DESSERT – YES, DESSERT! 

  • A bowl of berries with whipped cream 
  • Frozen yogurt (a small serving)  

EVENING SNACK OPTIONS 

  • Easy-to-eat dried fruit 
  • High-protein nuts 
  • A glass of milk or casein protein shake to supplement protein in dairy 
  • A decaf latte or hot chocolate while unwinding with family

GAME DAY: CARB-LOADING GALORE – AND WHY PLAYERS LOVE ‘COMFORT FOODS’ TO EASE NERVES  

There are some cardinal rules:

  1. Nothing unusual: Players will not be given food they’ve never had before
  2. Nothing fatty: That sits in the gut too long
  3. No fiber-rich salads: That takes too long to digest 

A BIG BREAKFAST

Jeff Saturday, former NFL player and Super Bowl winner, said he would have two breakfasts on the morning of game day, with a lie-down in between.

It’s common to have oatmeal, carb-heavy pancakes, a steak, or eggs with meat.   

LUNCH AT 3PM 

Kick-off is at 6.30pm, so it’s a good idea to eat at around 3pm, giving enough time for digestion. 

Lunch will usually be something starchy like pasta with a meaty sauce.

Toast, sausages, and vegetable stir-fry are also good options. 

THE SNACK: PB&J – THE ULTIMATE NERVE-EASING TREAT

As it turns out, even the best players in the league get game-day jitters. 

And what could be better for a nervous stomach than some nostalgic comfort food? 

For many players – in the NFL and the NBA alike – there’s nothing like a good old-fashioned peanut butter and jelly sandwich, Kansas City Chiefs dietitian Leslie Bond told CNN. 

The sweet sandwiches are best served with a tall glass of milk, too, for the full throw-back-to-childhood effect, she added. 

PB&J has even been called the ‘secret addiction’ of a surprising number of professional basketball players, according to ESPN.  

AFTER THE GAME: FEAST

Both the winners and the losers are treated to a buffet (though the losers tend not to attend theirs). 

It usually consists of wings, burgers, chips – any kind of indulgence they wish. 

For Tom Brady, it could be avocado ice cream and a significantly large portion of almonds.  

FAN FAVORITES: THE SURPRISING WATCH PARTY DISHES AMERICANS ARE COOKING UP THIS YEAR 

If you thought that football watch parties are all about chips, dips, wings and fried everything, this year’s hottest recipes may redefine your idea of kick-off cuisine. 

Google Trend’s has (literally) mapped out what fans and each state are planning to whip up for their watch parties this year. 

Taking a predictable lead was buffalo chicken dip – which is really more like a rich baked casserole of chicken, cream cheese, cheddar cheese, buffalo wing sauce and ranch dressing – is the most searched-for recipe in eight states. 

But from there the list gets a bit unpredictable. 

Instead of savory snacks, fans in Washington, Tennessee, Wyoming, South Dakota, Louisiana Hawaii, Florida and Arizona are going sweet and making cakes or cupcakes. 

Rather than state classics like fried okra and and cornbread, Mississippians are planning to try a healthier snack on Super Bowl Sunday: granola bars. 

And in Maine, fans are choosing more exotic far and cooking up Paella, the classic Spanish rice and protein dish.  

MOST-SEARCHED SUPER BOWL SUNDAY RECIPES IN EACH STATE  

This Google Trends map shows what dishes Americans are making in each state 

This Google Trends map shows what dishes Americans are making in each state 

This Google Trends map shows what dishes Americans are making in each state 

Alabama: White chicken chili

Alaska: Nachos

Arizona: Cake

Arkansas: Fried chicken wings

California: Baked chicken breast

Colorado: Broccoli cheese soup

Connecticut: Buffalo chicken dip

Delaware: Chocolate peanut butter cake

Washington, DC: Bagel pigs in a blanket

Florida: Cake

Georgia: Buffalo chicken dip

Hawaii: Football cupcakes

Idaho: Salads

Illinois: Jalapeno poppers

Indiana: Fried rice

Iowa: Irish stew

Kansas: Buffalo chicken dip

Kentucky: Taco salad

Louisiana: Cupcakes

Maine: Paella

Maryland: Pizza

Massachusetts: Gluten free pretzels

Michigan: Pizza

Minnesota: Tacos

Mississippi: Granola bars

Missouri: Broccoli cheese soup 

Montana: Lentil soup

Nebraska: Pigs in a blanket

Nevada: Vegan cheesy bacon spinach dip

New Hampshire: Cakes and cupcakes

New Jersey: Buffalo chicken dip

New Mexico: Pea and peppercorn mash

New York: Spinach dip

North Carolina: Cobb salad

North Dakota: Baked nachos

Ohio: Buffalo chicken dip

Oklahoma: Chicken noodle soup

Oregon: Banana bread

Pennsylvania: Chicken wings

Rhode Island: 7-layer dip

South Carolina: Turkey chili

South Dakota: Cupcakes

Tennessee: Cake

Texas: Spinach dip

Utah: Bacon wrapped smokies

Vermont: Lasagna

Virginia: Buffalo chicken dip

Washington: Cakes

West Virginia: Buffalo chicken dip

Wisconsin: Buffalo chicken dip

Wyoming: Cake



Source link

Tags

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Close
Close